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Kwanzaa is an African American and pan-African seven-day cultural festival that is celebrated every December 26 to January 1. Like most festivals, Kwanzaa incorporates music as an essential element of its celebration. The purpose of Kwanzaa is to celebrate African American heritage, family and community.Each of the seven 2½ min segments of The Seven Principles of Kwanzaa focuses on the specific principle of that day/date, and sheds a bit of light on either the principle itself, or some element of the celebration. The goal of these segments is to introduce audiences to the celebration and encourage an understanding of inclusion and diverse perspectives.

The 6th day of Kwanzaa, Kuumba or creativity.

Kwanzaa 6

Kwanzaa 6 Eric.mp3
Kwanzaa 6 Kearstin.mp3

On December 31st, the sixth day of Kwanzaa, a joyous celebration called a Karamu (kah-RAH-moo) is held, with food, drink, dance, music and gift giving with family and friends. It is a time of reassessment and recommitment to the seven principles of Kwanzaa. As is traditional each night, participants greet each other with Habari gani (Ha-ba-ri ga-ni) or What is the news with you?

On day six, celebrants reflect on the principle of Kuumba (koo-OOM-bah), which means creativity. The goal of Kuumba (koo-OOM-bah) is to do everything possible to make a difference and leave the community in better condition than what was inherited. The principle implies a daily investment in the future, or a donation to eternity.

As the sixth candle is lit, we remember that each night’s candle lighting is significant. The black candle represents the people, the three red candles represent the struggle they have endured, and the three green candles represent the hope that comes from the struggle. At the end of each night’s celebration Harambee! (hah-RAHM-beh) is called out, meaning “Let’s pull together!”

WXXI celebrates Kwanzaa and the principles that reflect and recommit to the collective achievement of a better life for our families, community and our people.